Tag Archives: OKB Grigorov

Building OKB Grigorov’s M109 (kit 72002)

Alright – so why do I keep labeling articles using the full kit name and number? Because most companies “milk” their designs and have multiple releases using the same basic kit (or some of it). OKB Grigorov has already released the A1 and A2 versions of the M109, kits No 72004 and 72005, respectively.

Back to our initial SPH variant.

What’s the first thing we usually do? Dry fit major components so we’re able to judge size and get motivated by the upcoming result! I sanded the turret base and the hull recess that is intended to accept it a bit. The model is pretty small, yet rather heavy for its size.

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OKB Grigorov’s M109 US SPH, kit 72002

Alright, another resin + PE monster from OKB Grigorov, and despite it’s lower Cat. No. (the AT-T was 72007) I got it in the beginning of this year to build for a review.

I must say I liked the kit from first sight. Relatively small number of parts that will make for a detailed, compact model of a vehicle that has a bunch of modifications still in use today, 50 years after its introduction.

So – onto the kit.

All the parts are packaged in zip-lock bags, all protected by bubble wrap and a sturdy white cardboard box. There are

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AT-T from OKB Grigorov

The weathered and completed (as of today) model. Added:

– windshield wipers – “wiped area” masked off, the rest sprayed Vallejo satin varnish;

– idlers, drive wheels and tracks;

– fire extinguishers;

– 0,3mm winch cable with scratch-built hook;

– 0,6mm RB Models tow cables with kit eyelets;

– headlamps (blackout lights);

– windows in the doors, attempted imitating seals with acrylic gel and paint;

– weathering, and a lot of it. An experiment with a new technique went so far as to lead to completely strip-down of  the paint on the hull/cargo bed assembly.

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Building OKB Grigorov’s AT-T, part II

In the first part of the build I basically completed the lower half of the vehicle and the cargo bed. Back to the crew compartment.

The AT-T’s front lights reside at the very front of the bonnet/hood on metal supports. In the kit these are PE parts, which supposedly butt-join the resin engine compartment, and on top of which the lights are glued. Images of broken-off detail in my mind lead me to soldering a piece of wire (in red) through each support like this (looking from the front):

Front light support scheme
Front light support scheme

This would make the whole thing a bit stronger.

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Building OKB Grigorov’s AT-T

I started construction with the chassis tub. First thing to do is gluing the back wall. Next I cut the suspension arms out of the casting block and it turned out the holes for their pins are much too small. Off with the pins, arms are drilled through, as is the tub itself – naturally observing the locations of the original holes.

I decided to use thick copper wire passing through the whole tub to make new pins. This would ease me in terms of affixing the pins and make the whole thing stronger.

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OKB Grigorov’s AT-T Soviet Heavy Artillery Tractor, kit 72007

Box top
Box top

The AT-T (Russian “Artilleriyskiy Tyagach – Tyazholiy”, Artillery Tractor – Heavy) was developed in the late 1940s using elements of the T-54 MBT (notably the running gear).

The main purpose of the vehicle was to tow heavy artillery pieces like the KS-30 130mm AA gun, the S-23 180mm gun and the B-4 203mm howitzer, so the machine got a 415HP version of the famous B-2 V-12 tank diesel. The standard 5-roadwheel chassis was used for a number of recovery and engineering vehicles. Extended versions (7 roadwheels) include the P-40 „Long Track” mobile radar, and an entire family of polar expedition vehicles.

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OKB Grigorov 1/72 T-60 (late), kit 72003

OKB Grigorov - T-60 box
OKB Grigorov – T-60 box

This tiny, but important tank, is the third venture of OKB Grigorov into the “complete AFV kits” world. The set is completely made up of resin castings (23 parts) and etched metal (two frets with a total of 32 parts). It represents the later variety of the T-60: the road wheels and the idler are identical and maximum armor thickness reached 35mm.

To protect “the precious” the company has placed it in a small, sturdy box – everything carefully packed in bubble wrap.

Inside the T-60's box
Inside the T-60’s box

You can see that resin castings and the etched frets are in separate zip-lock bags to prevent loss, bending and scratching.

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